Morocco will spend Dh1,000 billion by 2016

Home  /  News  /  Morocco will spend Dh1,000 billion by 2016

According to Salah-Eddine Kadmiri, general vice president of the CGEM, no less than DH 1,000 billion will be spent in Morocco in 2016 upgrading of cities and in the construction of new cities.

Morocco will spend Dh1,000 billion by 2016

Morocco will spend Dh1,000 billion by 2016

On the eve of the World Summit of the United Nations on climate, and when New York and several cities around the world house marches and demonstrations for Climate, held in Casablanca, the first edition of the Green Growth Academy. Organized with the initiative of the General Confederation of Enterprises of Morocco (CGEM) and the Moroccan Cleaner Production Centre (CMPP), the event was considered an equally important subject, “smart cities”.

Depending on the range of research being reached at the Academy Green Growth, urbanization of the world and Morocco is obvious. It is inevitable and even gaining more and more ground. According to Mohand Laenser, Minister of Planning and Regional Development that today, 60% of Morocco’s population live in cities. In ten years there will be 70%.

This imperative of sustainability obviously revolutionize business models of cities but will be expensive. If one relies on the Salah-Eddine about Kadmiri, general vice president of the CGEM, no less than 1.000 billion dirhams will be spent in Morocco in 2016 upgrading of cities and in the construction of new cities. But then, some models have demonstrated their urban limits. New York in the United States, South Korea Songdo or Masdar City in Abu Dhabi are far from role models.

There is no standard model for these smart cities, let alone a precise definition. Something that further complicates standardization worldwide. In terms of cost, Claude Rochet stated that mathematical extensive studies have shown that building a new city is much more expensive than to upgrade the management of a city.

According to the specialist human rights, we must move away from the notion of selective smart cities and ensure equitable access to all services so that citizens are truly appropriate. Otherwise, “it is an urban violence is exerted for those failing means and nothing else.”

Mohamed Dekkak